Category Archives: Immigration

When an Employee’s Social Security Number is Incorrect (or Fake)

In 2019, the Social Security Administration (“SSA”) is again starting to send “No Match” letters after a seven-year hiatus to employers who reported payroll taxes for an employee under an incorrect (or fake) Social Security number.

What are the legal do’s and don’ts when the company receives an “Employer Correction Notice” (more commonly known as a No Match letter) from the SSA or otherwise finds out that an employee’s Social Security number isn’t accurate?

  1. Don’t overreact. There are a number of reasons that an employee’s Social Security number may have been reported incorrectly, the most common being a transposition of numbers in the company’s system or a name change. Your responsibility as an employer is to carefully address this matter so you don’t violate any discrimination laws, but you also protect the company now that you know there is a problem.
  2. Don’t ignore. You have to act in response to a No Match letter or other knowledge that a Social Security number is invalid. But what actions you need to take should be discussed with your employment lawyer, who you should call immediately upon receipt of the No Match letter.
  3. Don’t fire anybody (yet). The letter itself will say, “You should not use this letter to take any adverse action against an employee, such as laying off, suspending, firing or discriminating against that individual just because his or her name or SSN does not match our records.”
  4. Don’t confuse the Social Security Administration with Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). No match letters come from SSA and must be addressed through the SSA system. There may be a connection between the incorrect Social Security number and the employee’s eligibility to work in the United States, but you are a long way from making that determination yet when you have just received the No Match letter. On the other hand, ICE may regard a failure on the part of the company to act correctly in response to a No Match letter as an indication of guilt in employing undocumented workers, which is why having an employment lawyer walk you through this process is essential.
  5. Do check your records. Make sure the mistake is not on your end—check that you correctly reported the name and Social Security number that your employee provided to you. If the mistake was yours, notify SSA of the correction.
  6. Do ask the employee to address the problem. After you confirm that the mistake is not on your end, you need to notify the employee in writing that he/she has the responsibility to clear up any discrepancy with SSA by a reasonable deadline (at least 90 days).  Advise your employee that failure to act immediately, to provide the corrected documents in a reasonable time or to provide a good-faith explanation of the problem could later be grounds for termination.
  7. Don’t make an employment eligibility decision yet. There is a dangerous tendency for Texas employers to suspect a Hispanic employee with an incorrect Social Security number might be ineligible to legally work in the United States. This bias could quickly get you sued for discrimination. Give every employee with a mistaken Social Security number a chance to correct that mistake through the SSA procedures. Don’t require an employee to fill out a new I-9 employment eligibility form until the SSA procedure is complete and then only if the employee used the incorrect Social Security number on the first I-9 that the employee filled out.
  8. Don’t turn a blind eye to an affirmative statement of ineligibility by the employee. On the other hand, employees will sometimes tell you when confronted with Social Security number mistake that the employee doesn’t have a Social Security number. Your response should still be, “Talk to SSA and get this corrected.” But if the employee actually says, “I’m not in the United States legally and can’t get a Social Security number because I’m not eligible to work here,” you have to take that admission of ineligibility to work seriously. There is a requirement that employers must terminate any employee immediately upon receiving actual knowledge that the employee is not authorized to work, such as when the employee admits to having submitted false documents for I-9 purposes or to entering the country illegally and never applying for a work permit. This is a red flag warning to call your employment attorney.
  9. Do consider if you need to adopt verification procedures at time of hiring. The SSA provides a verification service that you can use to check Social Security numbers for payroll purposes only (not I-9 purposes) at the time of hiring. Many background checking services will also offer this as part of their criminal background check. But if you are going to start verifying Social Security numbers with new hires, you must be consistent and verify every single employee to whom you make a job offer or your inconsistency can be considered discrimination.
  10. Don’t mistake SSA verification for E-Verify. E-Verify is the federal database for verifying employment eligibility for I-9 purposes. This is where you can find out if your employee really is legal to work in the United States. However, at the present time, there are so many red-tape and technical problems with E-Verify, which has been known to mistakenly block eligible workers, that I do not recommend that employers enroll in that system if you don’t have to (enrollment is mandatory for some employers, such as federal contractors).