Counting Consequences

One of the things I admire most about many of my clients in the Texas Panhandle is their entrepreneurial spirit. Many of them have created and nurtured several businesses to success. But there is a downside to owning many businesses: your employment headaches increase.

For example, if you have one employee who works for two of your businesses, such as a receptionist at your main office, you might be paying that employee out of two business accounts and not realizing that you have overtime obligations to that employee. Your two businesses may be “joint employers” of this receptionist if there are common officers or directors of the companies and/or there are common insurance, pension or payroll systems. If so, you must take the hours that receptionist works at all of your businesses into account when determining whether that employee should be paid overtime for working more than 40 hours in any one workweek.

Another consequence of owning more than one business is that the number of employees working at all of your businesses may need to be combined when deciding whether you have to comply with various federal employment laws, such as Title VII (which goes into effect when you employ 15 employees), the Americans with Disabilities Act (which requires 15 employees), the Age Discrimination in Employment Act (which requires 20 employees), the Family and Medical Leave Act, which requires that you provide up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave to your employees if you have 50 names on the payroll, or the Affordable Care Act, which mandates that employers with 50 or more full-time equivalent employees provide health insurance to their employees beginning in 2015 or face substantial penalties.

The Department of Labor and the EEOC will apply an “integrated employer” test to determine whether separate but related businesses are deemed to be a single entity for counting the number of employees (names on the payroll) to determine whether you are liable for discrimination under Title VII, the ADA, the ADEA or the FMLA. This test looks at four factors: common management of the two companies, interrelation between the operations of the companies, central operation of labor relations and some degree of common ownership or financial control. If your companies are integrated, you need to count names on all of your payrolls to determine if you need to be complying with these federal laws.

The Affordable Care Act counts employees a little differently and combines related companies differently also. The ACA requires that related entities count employees as if they were employed by one business to determine if you employ at least 50 full-time equivalent employees (and remember that the definition of “full-time” under the ACA is 30 hours per week). If your related companies all together employ 50 FTEs or more, you will have to provide your employees with health insurance beginning in 2015 or be ready to pay the penalties imposed on employers who do not comply. The ACA combines into one employer related entities such as parents and their subsidiaries, brother/sister companies where the same five people or entities own the equity in two or more companies, and affiliated service groups such as law firms, accounting firms, civic organizations and temporary staffing companies that are linked by at least some ownership (the statute refers to a 10% threshold) and closely collaborate in the services they provide.

Accurately counting the number of employees you employ when you own more than one business can be much more complicated than it initially appears. But getting that accurate count is essential to operating your businesses legally.

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